PARK AVENUE PROJECT

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ABOUT 

NYC, 2008-2014, architecture + interior design + furniture design

The complete head-to-toe renovation of this 6,000 square foot Gramercy residence is a playground for designers like us. It includes the top floor of an apartment building and its roof – and we added a mezzanine level for good measure (not to mention a pool and a glass bulkhead room). The great thing about a project like this is that our scope of work both expands and narrows enormously. We’re designing both how the space is structured, and also items as precise as custom door hardware. It is also the inspiration for a line of furniture, which will of course be adorning the apartment when it’s finished.

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The project, in all its facets, is the marriage between traditional Scandinavian design and contemporary New York. Because the building’s shell is lined with floor-to-ceiling windows, we’ve created a space that celebrates light. There aren’t an abundance of partitions, but the ones there are curved, allowing for sleek and beautiful transitions between rooms. There’s a green marble feature wall that travels through all three levels, and is visible from most perspectives. It represents the vibrant and lively concept behind this work, and what better way to do it than with a spectacular material, sourced by Søren himself.

The furniture collection we have created for De La Espada evolved out of our Park Avenue project in New York that began in 2008. All of the pieces are designed for real people and the result is a very dramatic collection that combines the best of Scandinavian tradition, with a New York contemporary touch. The collection exhibits true craftsmanship, while exploring new material combinations including cork, marble, aluminum, brass, fabric and natural wood. The collection is simple in nature yet obsessive in detail. The result is a family of long-lasting and timeless pieces, with a fresh take on modern living.

Photos by Thomas Loof